Act Now to be a Meaningful User In 2011

Incentive payments for physicians who adopt electronic health records (EHRs) will begin in 2011. To take full advantage, implement your EHR in 2010. Most physicians know by now that “ meaningful users ” of “ certified EHR technology ” are eligible to receive up to $44,000 over a five-year period.

Your Copy Machine: A Serious Security Risk?

It seems that even the most innocuous machines in the workplace can serve as a security threat to companies. According to this report from CBS News, many office copiers save the images they copy on a dedicated hard disk installed inside them. This means that everything from mundane memos to your most sensitive information such as financial statements and contracts are stored – and could potentially extracted.

Microsoft Technology Protects Your EMR Investment

The investment you make in acquiring electronic medical record (EMR) hardware and software is significant—but the investment you make in ensuring that the system works the way you want it to is even greater. How can you protect that investment? Physicians can easily spends hundreds of hours ensuring that their EMR works they way should.

25 Meaningful Use Criteria

The government has released its long-awaited definition of meaningful use—in a lengthy proposed regulation entitled “ Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program .” As you probably know, health care professionals can receive incentive payments for implementing an electronic health record (EHR), but they must demonstrate meaningful use of the EHR. What that means, exactly, has been unclear until now.

EMRs built with a balanced architecture

Why is it that doctors understand the benefits of adopting an electronic medical record (EMR), yet aren’t rushing to implement the technology? Cost is one factor, as is resistance to change—but the biggest reason, in our opinion, is that much of the available technology doesn’t match the way doctors think.

EHRs may increase physician drug safety reporting

As many physicians struggle with the financial and technical hurdles it takes to successfully implement an EHR, it’s easy to forget the reason the federal government is pushing for EHRs in the first place: improvement in health care. Case in point: A recent study shows physicians are more likely to report drug side effects through an EHR than they are through traditional paper reporting.