More Doctors are Implementing EMRs

More and more office-based physicians plan to implement EMRs and qualify for federal incentive payments, according to recent survey data released by the ONC. Moreover, 41 percent of doctors surveyed are planning to achieve meaningful use and take advantage of the incentive payments.

EMRs Benefit Even Small Providers, Says Survey

EMRs provide measurable benefits for providers of all sizes, including small practices, according to a recent survey. Plus, the return on investment is high: According to researcher, it costs just $7,857 and takes just 130 hours to implement an EMR at a five-member practice.

GOP Bill No Reason to Postpone EMR Implementation

Republican bill that imperils funding for meaningful use incentives has a long way to go before it becomes law — if it ever does. President Obama may have celebrated an emerging health care IT system in his State of the Union address, but at the same time, Republican lawmakers were producing a bill that imperils funding for meaningful use incentives.

IT Staffing Troubles Ahead?

More than half of CIOs across the country are worried they will have to put off planned electronic health record (EHR) implementations because they can’t find IT staff to get the job done — which would mean forfeiting thousands of dollars in government stimulus funds.

ONC Almost Ready to Announce EHR Certification Bodies

It looks as if we’ll soon know the names of the authorized testing and certification bodies (ATCBs) for electronic health records (EHRs). ATCBs will be the only authorities that can certify EHR products for meaningful use (and thus allow health care providers to earn American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or ARRA, incentives). According to the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology, officials are reviewing applications and will likely announce approved ATCBs before the end of the summer.

Be Prepared For Significant IT Investments As a Result of EHR Implementation

Government incentives will only offset electronic health record (EHR) costs by about 15% to 20%, according to McKinsey & Company—which means health care providers should be prepared to make a significant investment as part of a “radical new approach to IT.” According to their study published in management consulting firm McKinsey & Company’s business journal McKinsey Quarterly , American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) money will not come close to covering the expenses of an EHR. “This should not be a news flash,” wrote Paul Roemer on the Healthcare IT Strategy blog.

Health Care Practitioners Generally Approve of Final Meaningful Use Rule

The final rule on meaningful use was released on July 13, and is significantly more flexible than earlier versions. Specifically, the final rule includes “core” and “menu” requirements. It appears that practitioners are generally happy with the final rule on meaningful use that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of the National Coordination (ONC) released on July 13. The 864-page document, which took into account more than 2,000 comments received during a 60-day period, is significantly more flexible than earlier versions.

Providers lagging in IT to meet meaningful use

Most hospitals and hospital-based health care providers have their work cut out for them when it comes to meeting meaningful use requirements of EMRs, according to a new report. In the report, “The State of U.S. Hospitals Relative to Achieving Meaningful Use Measurements,” HIMSS Analytics compared the current state of hospital capabilities according to its own seven-stage EMR adoption model, which it calls EMRAM, and identified a number of implementation gaps.

US Will Have Digital Health Records In 5 Years Says Obama

US president elect Barack Obama said that after he takes office later this month the government will be investing money to make sure that the health records of all Americans are computerized within the next five years. Read more on Medical News Today…

US president elect Barack Obama said that after he takes office later this month the government will be investing money to make sure that the health records of all Americans are computerized within the next five years.