Is Health Care IT Living Up to Expectations?

EHRs are a long way from living up to expectations, according to a recent article in Computerworld — but not all EHRs present common problems. As of 2009, only 12% of U.S. hospitals had adopted electronic health records (EHRs), according to researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health . That may be because many EHR projects fail, according to a study by University College London . And they fail, in many cases, because they’re hard to use, to experts from the Institute of Medicine : Health care providers have to flip among many screens to access data, which can be more cumbersome than working with paper charts. So how can EMRs be improved? According to a July 2010 Computing Technology Industry Association survey, health care providers want increased speed, easier use, lower cost, removal of unnecessary functions, greater interoperability with other systems and better remote access. If you’re looking for this functionality, consider gloEMR from gloStream. It’s the only EMR with Microsoft Office built right in, which makes the sharing of data simple. It offers a user-friendly dashboard so one click is all it takes to find, view, and work with the most critical patient information. It also offers the potential for mobile computing, as gloStream is committed to meeting the ongoing needs of its customers now and in the future. Getting gloEMR is now easier than ever. gloStream recently announced the “glo For It!” EMR replacement program. Under the program, any practice that upgrades to gloEMR from a competitor’s EMR will receive a gloPM practice management license, a $7,500 value, for free. gloPM, the latest addition to the gloStream suite of products, is a powerful, easy to learn and use practice management system that simplifies scheduling, billing, and report creation—all with Microsoft technology. So don’t be one of 41% of doctors and nurses surveyed by the Computing Technology Industry Association who say they are only “partly satisfied/partly dissatisfied” with their EHR system; be totally satisfied with gloEMR. Related articles: Health care IT isn’t living up to the hype EHRs are a long way from living up to expectations, according to a recent article in Computerworldbut not all EHRs present common problems.

As of 2009, only 12% of U.S. hospitals had adopted electronic health records (EHRs), according toresearchers at the Harvard School of Public Health. That may be because many EHR projects fail, according to a study by University College London. And they fail, in many cases, because they’re hard to use, to experts from the Institute of Medicine: Health care providers have to flip among many screens to access data, which can be more cumbersome than working with paper charts.

So how can EMRs be improved? According to a July 2010 Computing Technology Industry Association survey, health care providers want increased speed, easier use, lower cost, removal of unnecessary functions, greater interoperability with other systems and better remote access.

If you’re looking for this functionality, consider gloEMR from gloStream. It’s the only EMR with Microsoft Office built right in, which makes the sharing of data simple. It offers a user-friendly dashboard so one click is all it takes to find, view, and work with the most critical patient information. It also offers the potential for mobile computing, as gloStream is committed to meeting the ongoing needs of its customers now and in the future.

Getting gloEMR is now easier than ever. gloStream recently announced the “glo For It!” EMR replacement program.Under the program, any practice that upgrades to gloEMR from a competitor’s EMR will receive a gloPM practice management license, a $7,500 value, for free. gloPM, the latest addition to the gloStream suite of products, is a powerful, easy to learn and use practice management system that simplifies scheduling, billing, and report creation—all with Microsoft technology.

So don’t be one of 41% of doctors and nurses surveyed by the Computing Technology Industry Association who say they are only “partly satisfied/partly dissatisfied” with their EHR system; be totally satisfied with gloEMR.

Related articles: Health care IT isn’t living up to the hype

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.