Can You Afford an EHR?

Despite $20 billion in EMR implementation incentives offered by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, there’s still a problem when it comes to calculating return on investment in health care IT, according to a recent Computerworld article. First, many health care providers have a hard time generating the upfront capital required to invest in an EHR in the first place. Second, any cost savings from the implementation of an EMR often don’t go to the owner of the technology but to another player in the health care system, such as insurers. That being the case, is an EMR really worth it? Certainly, in the sense that EMRs can save health care providers money — if they’re implemented and used properly. Key to doing so, however, is implementing an EMR that works with your processes, and training staff to use it properly. Future changes in the health care system could also make EMRs more cost-effective. For example, according to the Computerworld article, as the government moves toward a reimbursement model that pushes the cost of treating problems caused by poor care back onto the providers, EMRs could become more cost-effective. For now, however, it’s essential to ensure that your EMR works for you — which means making sure you have the recommendations of your IT provider before you implement, and the cooperation of your staff during implementation and use. Related articles : Health care IT isn’t living up to the hype Despite $20 billion in EMR implementation incentives offered by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, there’s still a problem when it comes to calculating return on investment in health care IT, according to a recent Computerworld article.

First, many health care providers have a hard time generating the upfront capital required to invest in an EHR in the first place.

Second, any cost savings from the implementation of an EMR often don’t go to the owner of the technology but to another player in the health care system, such as insurers.

That being the case, is an EMR really worth it?

Certainly, in the sense that EMRs can save health care providers moneyif they’re implemented and used properly. Key to doing so, however, is implementing an EMR that works with your processes, and training staff to use it properly.

Future changes in the health care system could also make EMRs more cost-effective. For example, according to the Computerworld article, as the government moves toward a reimbursement model that pushes the cost of treating problems caused by poor care back onto the providers, EMRs could become more cost-effective.

For now, however, it’s essential to ensure that your EMR works for youwhich means making sure you have the recommendations of your IT provider before you implement, and the cooperation of your staff during implementation and use.

Related articles: Health care IT isn’t living up to the hype

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.