Are You Using Best Practices for EHR Implementation?

When 30 percent to 40 percent of all electronic health record (EHR) implementations fail, by some estimates, following best practices is essential to success — and those practices are surprisingly simple, according to two consultants. The following six best practices are essential to success in EHR implementation. Understand that a medical practice is not an extension of a hospital. Your practice will have different EHR needs — so don’t duplicate what the hospital has done. Tailor your EHR to fit within staff workflows. No EHR will meet every single user’s needs, but you can decide which aspects should work for all users and which aspects can be adjusted on a case-by-case basis. To do this, talk to your staff — and be sure you have their recommendations and cooperation before proceeding. Eliminate duplication. Minimize redundant data entry, such as patient demographics. That data should be entered once — but available throughout all modules and interfaces. Don’t rush implementation. Train, train, train — beginning with the basics, and following a carefully planned set of procedures. It will save you time later. Identify ways the EHR could fail. Talk to users to find out how they think the EHR could fail — and use that knowledge to prevent problems in the future. Work with experts. Assistance from someone who has experience in successfully implementing EHRs is critical — and can make the difference in success or failure. Related articles: Six best practices for EHR implementation When 30 percent to 40 percent of all electronic health record (EHR) implementations fail, by some estimates, following best practices is essential to successand those practices are surprisingly simple, according to two consultants.

The following six best practices are essential to success in EHR implementation.

Understand that a medical practice is not an extension of a hospital. Your practice will have different EHR needsso don’t duplicate what the hospital has done.

Tailor your EHR to fit within staff workflows. No EHR will meet every single user’s needs, but you can decide which aspects should work for all users and which aspects can be adjusted on a case-by-case basis. To do this, talk to your staffand be sure you have their recommendations and cooperation before proceeding.

Eliminate duplication. Minimize redundant data entry, such as patient demographics. That data should be entered oncebut available throughout all modules and interfaces.

Don’t rush implementation. Train, train, trainbeginning with the basics, and following a carefully planned set of procedures. It will save you time later.

Identify ways the EHR could fail. Talk to users to find out how they think the EHR could failand use that knowledge to prevent problems in the future.

Work with experts. Assistance from someone who has experience in successfully implementing EHRs is criticaland can make the difference in success or failure.

Related articles: Six best practices for EHR implementation

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.