ONC Almost Ready to Announce EHR Certification Bodies

It looks as if we’ll soon know the names of the authorized testing and certification bodies (ATCBs) for electronic health records (EHRs). ATCBs will be the only authorities that can certify EHR products for meaningful use (and thus allow health care providers to earn American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or ARRA, incentives). According to the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology, officials are reviewing applications and will likely announce approved ATCBs before the end of the summer. Although the ONC has not announced the names of ATBC applications, Drummond Group, an interoperability testing company, and Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT), a nonprofit, have announced their applications. After ATCBs are approved, they will attend a training session in Washington, DC, to learn how to certify EHRs in a manner that is consistent with the testing criterion supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. After that, the ATCBs will be open to business at their own discretion—which is a good thing, given that health care providers can start collecting data on January 1. Ultimately, the ONC plans to launch a web site that will contain a list of ATCB-certified products, called the Certified Health IT Product List (CHPL).It looks as if we’ll soon know the names of the authorized testing and certification bodies (ATCBs) for electronic health records (EHRs). ATCBs will be the only authorities that can certify EHR products for meaningful use (and thus allow health care providers to earn American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or ARRA, incentives).

According to the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology, officials are reviewing applications and will likely announce approved ATCBs before the end of the summer.

Although the ONC has not announced the names of ATBC applications, Drummond Group, an interoperability testing company, and Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT), a nonprofit, have announced their applications.

After ATCBs are approved, they will attend a training session in Washington, DC, to learn how to certify EHRs in a manner that is consistent with the testing criterion supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. After that, the ATCBs will be open to business at their own discretion—which is a good thing, given that health care providers can start collecting data on January 1.

Ultimately, the ONC plans to launch a web site that will contain a list of ATCB-certified products, called the Certified Health IT Product List (CHPL).

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.