EMRs built with a balanced architecture

Why is it that doctors understand the benefits of adopting an electronic medical record (EMR), yet aren’t rushing to implement the technology? Cost is one factor, as is resistance to change—but the biggest reason, in our opinion, is that much of the available technology doesn’t match the way doctors think.  An EMR built on a balanced architecture model can fix that problem. A balanced architecture model combines three essential elements that help doctors practice medicine electronically, but on their own terms: The doctor dashboard: a home screen from which each section of the patient’s medical chart can be accessed with one click. Discreet data elements: Values that can be chosen from a list, such as a drop-down menu. Free flow text: the ability to input information by typing text into a Word document, using voice recognition technology, or using Microsoft drawing tools (for example, to highlight a portion of an x-ray). The combination of these elements creates unprecedented flexibility in an EMR that allows doctors to drastically increase efficiency – and therefore productivity. For example, doctors can quickly check boxes to indicate a patient’s complaint and current medication. All of that data can then be augmented with dictation that reveals the doctor’s findings and instructions. For more information, read our balanced architecture white paper “ Increasing Efficiency and Productivity in the Modern Day Medical Practice “

Why is it that doctors understand the benefits of adopting an electronic medical record (EMR), yet aren’t rushing to implement the technology? Cost is one factor, as is resistance to change—but the biggest reason, in our opinion, is that much of the available technology doesn’t match the way doctors think.  An EMR built on a balanced architecture model can fix that problem.

A balanced architecture model combines three essential elements that help doctors practice medicine electronically, but on their own terms:

  • The doctor dashboard: a home screen from which each section of the patient’s medical chart can be accessed with one click.
  • Discreet data elements: Values that can be chosen from a list, such as a drop-down menu.
  • Free flow text: the ability to input information by typing text into a Word document, using voice recognition technology, or using Microsoft drawing tools (for example, to highlight a portion of an x-ray).

The combination of these elements creates unprecedented flexibility in an EMR that allows doctors to drastically increase efficiency – and therefore productivity.

For example, doctors can quickly check boxes to indicate a patient’s complaint and current medication. All of that data can then be augmented with dictation that reveals the doctor’s findings and instructions.

For more information, read our balanced architecture white paper “Increasing Efficiency and Productivity in the Modern Day Medical Practice

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.