EHRs may increase physician drug safety reporting

As many physicians struggle with the financial and technical hurdles it takes to successfully implement an EHR, it’s easy to forget the reason the federal government is pushing for EHRs in the first place: improvement in health care. Case in point: A recent study shows physicians are more likely to report drug side effects through an EHR than they are through traditional paper reporting. To conduct the study, Pfizer surveyed 300 physicians, two-thirds of whom utilized an EHR and one-third of whom used a paper-based system. Half of all respondents said they would be more likely to report drug data using an EHR. That’s because an EHR is a much more convenient and efficient way of reporting. Paper-based reporting an adverse drug event could take up to 40 minutes to complete; EHR reporting takes minutes. Moreover, 60 percent of respondents think the use of EHR will improve patient care. That’s because EHR reporting of adverse drug effects could increase the FDA’s product safety profiles. Although the study confirmed a common barrier to EHR adoption is cost, the federal government is offering up to $44,000 in incentive payments to physicians who prove “meaningful use” of an EHR—and those who start early stand to benefit the most. Contact us for more information. Related article: Study shows ehrs may increase physician drug safety reporting

As many physicians struggle with the financial and technical hurdles it takes to successfully implement an EHR, it’s easy to forget the reason the federal government is pushing for EHRs in the first place: improvement in health care.

Case in point: A recent study shows physicians are more likely to report drug side effects through an EHR than they are through traditional paper reporting.

To conduct the study, Pfizer surveyed 300 physicians, two-thirds of whom utilized an EHR and one-third of whom used a paper-based system.

Half of all respondents said they would be more likely to report drug data using an EHR. That’s because an EHR is a much more convenient and efficient way of reporting. Paper-based reporting an adverse drug event could take up to 40 minutes to complete; EHR reporting takes minutes.

Moreover, 60 percent of respondents think the use of EHR will improve patient care. That’s because EHR reporting of adverse drug effects could increase the FDA’s product safety profiles.

Although the study confirmed a common barrier to EHR adoption is cost, the federal government is offering up to $44,000 in incentive payments to physicians who prove “meaningful use” of an EHR—and those who start early stand to benefit the most.

Contact us for more information.

Related article:

Study shows ehrs may increase physician drug safety reporting

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.